Stupid Fly Fishing Cars to avoid

Stupid Fly Fishing Cars to avoid


The Unaccomplished Angler

Link to The Unaccomplished Angler

Stupid Fly Fishing Cars to avoid

Posted: 24 Oct 2016 05:29 PM PDT

"Hey, let's go fishing. I'll drive!"

Way back in 2011 I went to great lengths to compile a list of the Top Six Stupidest Fly Fishing Cars. I’m confident that my list saved many a reader from making a regrettable purchase. Since then I’ve been giving the matter some more thought, and because there is a whole new generation of cars available, I feel it’s my responsibility to once again be an advocate for the fly fishing consumer.

But Forbes beat me to it, more or less, with their list of 15 New Cars To Avoid.

Their impressive list of unimpressive cars doesn’t specify that these cars would be particularly stupid for fly fishing, but it’s a safe assumption that what’s bad for the gander (everyone) is also bad for the goose (fly angling types). So, there’s no point in me reinventing the stupid wheel since Forbes did it already, but I’ll simply add my brief commentary here:

  1. BMW 7 Series. While not particularly ugly, one would feel rather out of place pulling into Twin Bridges, MT driving one of these. $80+K buys a lot of something else. And I doubt you can order one with a tow package.
  2. Cadillac XTS. If you’re going to drive a Cadillac to go fishing, it better have massive fins and be 20 feet long and weigh 4000 lbs. And it should be a convertible.
  3. Dodge Journey. Forbes says “Dodge’s 7 passenger crossover SUV is long overdue for a redesign…” Long overdue?  That means they’ve been out for a while. Never even heard of these. Looks like a station wagon to me.
  4. Fiat 500L. I remember Fiat for it’s unreliable little boxy cars back in the 70’s (FIAT was a popular acronym before acronyms were popular). Then it seems, Fiat disappeared for decades. Now it appears they’re back, unfortunately.
  5. Jeep Compass. Not surprising to hear that Jeep gets low marks for reliability—just about every Jeep I’ve owned was plagued with problems, except my 2000 Cherokee, which was pretty much bullet proof. I should have kept it.
  6. Jeep Patriot.  OK, I can confirm that this is a horrible vehicle. We rented one in Nashville last summer, and it was dangerous to drive due to being so horribly underpowered that it couldn’t get out of its own way. Seriously—I pressed the gas pedal to the floor. The diminutive little motor would cry out definatly but the vehicle would not move. It was as if it had square tires.
  7. Jeep Wrangler. Well, Jeep is really racking up the points, aren’t they? Still, the Wrangler is quite popular. I guess, with its relatively spartan appointments and boxy sheetmetal that isn’t horribly removed from the days of the CJ, people are attracted to the Wrangler because there’s nothing else out there even remotely like it. (Hint: Hey Ford—bring back the Early Bronco in some form, eh?)
  8. Lincoln MKS. Not sure why Ford even keeps the Lincoln division around any more.
  9. Lincoln MKT. See previous comment.
  10. Mitsubishi iMiEV. What? LOL!
  11. Mitsubishi Mirage. The definition of ‘mirage’ is, “Something that appears real or possible but is not in fact so.” I wish that were the case with this eyesore.
  12. Nissan Armada. I’ve long thought that Nissan was making some of the ugliest vehicles the past few years. Turns out they’re not only ugly, but unreliable.
  13. Nissan Titan. By far the ugliest of all pickups currently offered up in the marketplace, and apparently one of the worst, too.
  14. Scion iQ.  Huh?
  15. Smart ForTwo.  The Smart car was on my list of Top Six Stupidest Fly Fishing Cars. Good to see it’s still getting the attention it deserves.

Thanks to Forbes for stealing my thunder doing the legwork so I didn’t have to.

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Faithful to the end: An interview with Eugene Peterson

By  September 27, 2013


One of America’s best known Christian theologians, Eugene Peterson, reflects on 81 years of life and ministry.

Eugene Peterson is one of the best known theologians of our time. Most famous for penning The Message, a contemporary rendering of the Bible, he is also author of many popular books such as A Long Obedience in the Same DirectionWith the release of his memoir, The PastorPeterson has begun reflecting on life and the ways in which Jesus-followers can respond to God’s call. Here, we discuss his unlikely call to ministry, the work of a pastor and what, if anything, he wishes he could change about The Message.

JM: In The Pastor, you describe your journey into ministry. How did you first sense God calling you into service?

EP: Well, I never really thought I’d be a pastor because I had so many pastors I didn’t respect. I just assumed I would be in academic work, so I started doing that—I went to seminary and graduate school to be a professor. And then I became a professor at the seminary in New York City where I graduated. But they didn’t pay me very much. Greek and Hebrew professors aren’t very high on the pay scale. So I got a part-time job in a church, because I had been ordained but just to be a professor. I’d never been around a pastor who was a man of God, to tell you the truth.

I was teaching Greek and Hebrew on Tuesdays and Thursdays and after awhile I did this for three years. But after the second year I thought, “Wow, the church is a lot more interesting than the classroom. There’s no ambiguity to Greek and Hebrew. It’s just right or wrong.” And in the church everything was going every which way all the time—dying, being born, divorces, kids running away. I suddenly realized that this is where I really got a sense of being involved and not just sitting on the sidelines as a spectator but being in the game. So I gradually reshaped my sense of what I was doing and became a pastor.

JM: With your experience in both the church and the academy, I wonder what advice you would give to young seminary students today. If you were asked by one to describe what is at the heart of the work of pastoring and shepherding, what would you say?

EP: I’d tell them that pastoring is not a very glamorous job. It’s a very taking-out-the-laundry and changing-the-diapers kind of job. And I think I would try to disabuse them of any romantic ideas of what it is. As a pastor, you’ve got to be willing to take people as they are. And live with them where they are. And not impose your will on them. Because God has different ways of being with people, and you don’t always know what they are.

The one thing I think is at the root of a lot of pastors’ restlessness and dissatisfaction is impatience. They think if they get the right system, the right programs, the right place, the right location, the right demographics, it’ll be a snap. And for some people it is: if you’re a good actor, if you have a big smile, if you are an extrovert. In some ways, a religious crowd is the easiest crowd to gather in the world. Our country’s full of examples of that. But for most, pastoring is a very ordinary way to live. And it is difficult in many ways because your time is not your own, for the most part, and the whole culture is against you. This consumer culture, people grow up determining what they want to do by what they can consume. And the Christian gospel is just quite the opposite of that. And people don’t know that. And pastors don’t know that when they start out. We’ve got a whole culture that is programmed to please people, telling them what they want.  And if you do that, you might end up with a big church, but you won’t be a pastor.

JM: You’ve written dozens of books over your career. Which one do you consider to be your magnum opus, and why?

EP: You know, I didn’t know it was when I was doing it, but I suppose The Message could be that book. The odd thing is when people ask me, “What do you like of what you’ve done?” I never think of The Message. Because I never felt like it was my book. You know, a writer likes to write really well. And you like to really have your own things. I was always second place to Isaiah, and coming in second to Mark, and to Paul. I never was writing what I was proud of. I was just pleased I was able to get into their life and do it in my way. But I really never even think of The Message as being my book.

When I finished my work at Regent College, I’d been teaching there for six years. And I’d written all these books on pastoral life and lay life. But I didn’t have any structure in mind. I just wrote these kind of as they came to me, and what I was doing and thinking about and reacting to. But I thought, the whole world of Christian life, spiritual theology, is not really very healthy. It’s mostly about being yourself in charge of things. There are a lot of really good scholarly books which are profound, but I’m thinking about pastors most of the time. And so I thought I’d like to gather up everything I’ve done in a sequential and comprehensive way. So I got the idea of writing five books—Jan calls it the “Peterson Pentateuch”—to see if I could get the whole world of Christian life, in this society, in this culture, and have it deeply biblically-oriented, with a Trinitarian structure and everything, and do it in language that people could understand. And so I did five books. I call them Conversations in Spiritual Theologyand I really feel satisfied with those books. I think I said best what I’ve been saying all my life, but I’ve done it in an organized and sequential and comprehensive way.

Peterson's "The Message" has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.

Peterson’s “The Message” has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.

JM: You mentioned The Message, your paraphrase of the Scriptures, which has been such a blessing to so many and an international bestseller. When you read it now, are you pleased with it or are there passages you wish you could go back and render differently?

EP: I’m a little hesitant to say this, but when I was doing that—maybe I should say that I could never have done that without being a pastor. I knew the languages really well, but I focused on getting into the idiom of the congregation as I was writing the translation, which took me 12 years. I always had the sense that I was working out of something I didn’t know much about: the metaphors. And it just kind of flowed. So I learned that language by listening to people from my congregation, and I guess I had a sense that there was something going on besides me. It never ever really dawned on me to do a translation of the Bible, so when the publishers approached me, I said “no” immediately. And then they kept talking and calling and I started praying and I thought, “Well, maybe this is my work now.” I’d been a pastor for 30 years in one church, and I was 60 years old. I thought, “Well, maybe this is it.” So, I did. And I’m really glad I did. But to tell you the truth, I don’t read it much. Every once in awhile I pick it up and start reading and think, “How did I think of that? I never knew that before.” I’d say I’m mostly pleased with it.

JM: Your book, A Long Obedience in the Same Direction, has become something of a Christian classic since it was released more than thirty years ago. How have you seen discipleship change over the last three decades and what advice would you offer people who want to live that long obedience in the midst of an instant society?

EP: I hate to be pessimistic, but it’s declined. At this point the world is making a bigger impact on people than discipleship is. And so I think you end up working with small starts and long finishes. I can’t believe A Long Obedience has had as long of a life as it has. Another thing that’s hard for me to believe—you know I’ve not written for a popular audience—I’ve written 35 books and they’re all still in print. Well, not all of them, but 35 of them! That’s almost unheard of these days. So there are people who are reading my books who I wouldn’t have guessed. It pleases me that some people are listening to something, which I think is biblical and Trinitarian and in some ways anti-cultural.

JM: I heard A Long Obedience was almost not A Long Obedience

EP: A Long Obedience had been rejected by 20 or so publishers. And InterVarsity said yes. So I went to Chicago, to the press, and they said, “It’s a great book but you can’t use that title—its is not a lively title. ‘Obedience’ is not a word that makes people jump up and down.”

So I said, “Look, it’s not my title, it’s Nietzche’s title. And it’s in iambic pentameter. It’s a piece of poetry. And wouldn’t you just love it if we got that title and Nietzeche came back from the grave and saw that and thought, ‘Wow, somebody used this great sentence of mine for a book.’ And then he looks at it, and he realizes it’s about God. Who he thought he’d buried a hundred years ago. And so this grin goes off his face.” Anyway, I’m glad I disappointed him.

JM: In November, you’ll turn 81 years old. What has the aging process taught you about life and how to be faithful to the end?

EP: It’s kind of nice, to tell you the truth. Last November, I was 80 and I thought, “I’ve been under writing deadlines all my adult life.” I loved writing—I didn’t really like the deadlines—but now I don’t have to do that anymore, so I decided I wouldn’t. So my wife, Jan, and I just called it “quits” to traveling. I don’t really enjoy travel; it’s really a lot of work these days. So I’m done with that. And I’ve had this huge sense of spaciousness as a result—I didn’t know you could live this way! The only difficulty is that I don’t have very much energy to enjoy it as I used to. We’re in a lovely place: our children are doing well, our grandchildren are a lot of fun. And I have friends all over the world.

JM: Eighty-one years is a long time. As you enter your final season of life, what would you like to say to younger Christians who are itchy for a deeper and more authentic discipleship? What’s your word to them? 

EP: Go to the nearest smallest church and commit yourself to being there for 6 months. If it doesn’t work out, find somewhere else. But don’t look for programs, don’t look for entertainment, and don’t look for a great preacher. A Christian congregation is not a glamorous place, not a romantic place. That’s what I always told people. If people were leaving my congregation to go to another place of work, I’d say, “The smallest church, the closest church, and stay there for 6 months.” Sometimes it doesn’t work. Some pastors are just incompetent. And some are flat out bad. So I don’t think that’s the answer to everything, but it’s a better place to start than going to the one with all the programs, the glitz, all that stuff.

JM: I know I speak for millions when I say, “Thank you for being faithful. Faithful to the end.”

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Julie Lythcott-Haims: How to raise successful kids — without over-parenting

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My Silence Is Not Compliance: Why I Don’t Preach Politics from the Pulpit Preachers need to take our cue from God’s Word, not the current obsession of the 24-hour news cycle. by Karl Vaters

Note: Although I have never been attacked or called a coward concerning a political or controversial topic, I appreciate Karl Vaters perspective given here.

Idon’t speak on political issues in my church.

I don’t support candidates.

I don’t address legislation.

I never take a side on controversial news items when I’m behind the pulpit.

And I’m tired of being called a coward because of it.

On behalf of myself and many Christians like me, I’d like to make a request.

Stop accusing fellow Christians of doing nothing just because we’re not called to do what you’re called to do.

Stop accusing fellow Christians of doing nothing just because we’re not called to do what you’re called to do.

We may not preach on political issues, but that doesn’t mean we’re sticking our heads in the sand. There are other options.

Quiet ≠ Cowardice

I’m not a wimp in the pulpit. Preaching from scripture often means taking an unpopular stand on hard moral issues. Sometimes those stands correspond with current affairs. Sometimes they highlight problems we’re ignoring because we’re being distracted by the shiny sin-bauble currently in the news.

When I preach, I try to take my cue from God’s Word, not the current obsession of the 24-hour news cycle.

But I know what’s coming. The next election will be called “the most important decision of our lives.” The next (or current) moral issue will be labeled “a defining moment for the church.” I’ll get phone calls, emails, Facebook pleas and drop-bys from people with flyers, petitions and upcoming rallies they want me to promote.

I’ll be told that if I don’t re-post their meme, promote their cause or denounce their enemy, I’m

  • Cowardly
  • Ignoring the issue
  • Letting the other side win
  • Compromising on the truth
  • or part of the problem (my personal favorite).

But none of that is true.

Just because I’m not responding to the current cultural/moral/political/social issue the way some people think I should, does not mean I’m ignoring it.

One Person at a Time

Recently, a bunch of pastors were having a heated, yet civil Facebook discussion on a moral issue. Several were decrying the silence from our pulpits on it. I commented that I don’t mention it from the pulpit because we’re ministering directly to people who are suffering from it.

The response was strong and fast. Caring for individuals is fine, ​they said, but we’re not changing things unless we denounce it regularly from the pulpit.

Almost everyone dismissed the idea of caring for hurting people with an electronic wave of their hands because they wanted to get to the “important” task of preaching about it, instead.

But Jesus never did that. He didn’t discuss politics unless he was dragged into it. And, even then, he sidestepped their political angle and stuck to his agenda.

Jesus never allowed others to define what mattered. He made them come to him. He wasn’t distracted by the controversial issues of the day – and there were plenty. Instead, he took care of people.

When the disciples dismissed a group of kids so they could discuss big-picture issues, Jesus rebuked them, put a child on his knee and told them this is what the kingdom of God looks like.

Working Quietly, But Still Working

Not everyone who seems to be quiet about evil is actually being quiet about it.

Not everyone who seems to be quiet about evil is actually being quiet about it.

For instance, in World War II many wore uniforms, took up arms and bravely fought against the evils of totalitarianism.

Meanwhile in Germany, Oscar Schindler ran a factory supposedly making ammunition for the Nazis. In reality, he was leveraging his reputation as a Nazi collaborator to undercut their efforts, while saving the lives of hundreds of Jews. If he had spoken out politically, he would not have been able to save those people.

The French underground worked in a similar way, by silent subterfuge. Those who hid thousands of Jews, like Anne Frank and her family, did the same thing. Their silence was not compliance, it was an essential element of their strategy.

While I am certainly not in the same category as those heroes, the truth is that there are many in the current culture who are doing something similar.

I know some bold culture warriors who are often accused of not taking a stand because they are not making broad statements. But it’s their apparent silence that allows them to make a big difference in some very personal, private ways.

You Be a Hand, I’ll Be a Foot

We’re not all called to respond to every issue in the same way.

As Paul taught, some are eyes, others are hands. And the eye can’t tell the hand it’s not doing the right thing just because it’s not acting like a hand.

If you’re called to speak on big issues in public forums, go for it. But don’t criticize those who are called to be change-makers in different, less visible ways.

If you’re called to respond to today’s issues in a more private and personal way, do that with all your heart. And don’t let anyone make you feel guilty for it.

But, by all means, do something.

If we all play our part without criticizing the other parts, we may be amazed at what a unified body, inspired by the Holy Spirit, is able to accomplish.

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